It is the goal of all EATechs staff to gain as much experience and knowledge for the purpose of understanding the limits and/or extent environmental factor may attribute to complaints revolving around your health, and your property (including future value(s).

What does this mean? It means that the staff of EATechs have gained the expected knowledge to conduct reliable investigation, inspections, indoor air quality sampling, heating ventilation, & air conditioning (HV/AC) inspections, and assemble reports reflecting our findings. The CRMI holder has met the following experience and body of knowledge:

The CRMI is a third party (CESB) accredited designation.

The Council for Engineering and Scientific Specialty Boards (CESB) has accredited certification programs in engineering and applied science since 1990. CESB is entirely independent of industry organizations, and exists solely to promote high standards in the certification industry.

CESB accreditation is extremely difficult to achieve. It is available only to certifying bodies who maintain rigorous standards for candidate eligibility and program operation. Accredited certifying bodies must be independent of training organizations. They must follow strict guidelines for exam development and security. They must evaluate education and field experience as well as exam performance. Such standards are the reason that CESB-accredited programs like the Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) are revered as marks of integrity and credibility.The IAQ Council has achieved CESB accreditation for eight of its certification programs.
Eligibility:
Applicants must possess one of the following combinations of education and relevant field experience:
* A two-year science-related college degree or its equivalent (15 semester-hours of science) and one (1) year of verifiable field experience either as a home inspector or as a licensed pest control inspector, performing residential structural inspections for purposes of property transfer; or
* Two (2) years of verifiable field experience either as a home inspector or as a licensed pest control inspector, performing residential structural inspections for purposes of property transfer; or
* Another ACAC certification in good standing.
The Required Body of Knowledge:
The effective practice of residential mold inspections requires detailed knowledge of standards promulgated by the Indoor Environmental Standards Organization, as summarized on the following list.
1. IESO, Standards of Practice for the Assessment of Indoor Environmental Quality, Volume I: Mold Sampling; Assessment of Mold Contamination, 2nd edition (2003), including:
*Standard 1110 – Tape Sampling Standard 1120 – Swab Sampling
*Standard 1210 – Air Cassette Sampling
*Standard 1220 – Viable (Culturable) Air *Sampling
*Standard 1310 – Dust Sampling
*Standard 2110 – Level I Assessment
*Standard 2210 – Level II Assessment
2. EPA, A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture and Your Home (EPA 400-K-02-003) (www.epa.gov/iaq/molds/moldguide.html)

The Required Skills:
Council-certified Residential Mold Inspectors (CRMIs) have demonstrated their knowledge of standard practices (as defined by the Indoor Environmental Standards Organization) relating to the following skills:
1. The inspection of residential structures for mold colonization
a. An understanding of the principles governing the relationship between moisture intrusion and mold growth within the building envelope
b. An understanding of the scope and limitations of the inspector’s work in the assessment of residential structures for mold colonization
c. An understanding of the terminology associated with mold colonization
d. An understanding of the procedures for non-invasive inspection of residential structures for visible suspect conditions
e. An understanding of proper sampling protocols for residential mold inspections
f. An understanding of protocols for the interpretation of sampling data collected in residential mold inspections
g. An understanding of proper health and safety procedures associated with residential mold inspections
h. An understanding of the applicability and limitations of inspections conducted according to IESO Standard 2210
2. The evaluation of mold colonization on surfaces
a. An understanding of the scope and limitations of the inspector’s work in evaluating mold colonization
b. An understanding of the terminology associated with mold colonization
c. An understanding of proper sampling protocols for the evaluation of mold colonization
d. An understanding of basic data interpretation techniques for the comparison of suspect to non suspect areas
e. An understanding of the applicability and limitations of evaluations performed according to IESO Standard 2110
3. The collection of surface samples by means of clear adhesive tape or wetted swabs
a. An understanding of the terminology associated with the sampling process
b. An understanding of the equipment and supplies necessary to conduct each type of sample collection, and of the methods for calibration and operation of such equipment
c. An understanding of proper sampling protocols for the collection of surface samples
d. An understanding of the advantages and limitations of each collection method 4. The collection of air samples by means of cassette slide impactors or viable impactors
a. An understanding of the terminology associated with the sampling process
b. An understanding of the equipment and supplies necessary to conduct each type of sample collection, and of the methods for calibration and operation of such equipment
c. An understanding of proper sampling protocols for the collection of air samples
d. An understanding of the advantages and limitations of the each collection method
5. The collection of dust samples from carpeting and other surfaces by means of vacuum filtration devices
a. An understanding of the terminology associated with the sampling process
b. An understanding of the equipment and supplies necessary to conduct each type of sample collection, and of the methods for calibration and operation of such equipment
c. An understanding of proper sampling protocols for the collection of dust samples
d. An understanding of the advantages and limitations of the collection method